Message regarding COVID-19

As of March 19, 2020
In order to do our part in protecting vulnerable populations and to slow the transmission of COVID-19, many programs of the Alliance will be limiting in-person contact during the crisis. This has not been an easy decision, but we want to ensure everyone that services will still be provided to anyone that needs them.

Mountain Crisis Services will be limiting in person services for survivors at our office. Some in-person appointments will be necessary and will be scheduled by staff. Our hotline will be operational 24/7, our domestic violence shelter is still operating, and all counseling will be done via telephone or through video-based services. Legal Advocacy will still be available and advocates will still accompany survivors to court.

The Alliance provides services to some of the most vulnerable people in our community and we will continue throughout this crisis. We are working diligently to ensure our staff are supported during this time so that we can continue to offer these vital services. We look forward to when our services can resume without restrictions and we will continue to make changes as things evolve. Feel free to reach out to any of our programs to learn how to access services or how you can be a support during this time.

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Abuse

Gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people experience domestic abuse at the same rate as heterosexual women.

Domestic violence – it’s something that can affect anyone. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) people do experience domestic abuse, but the reality of LGBTQ relationship violence is rarely discussed. LGBTQ people can be reluctant to seek help from the police for fear of homophobic or transphobic treatment, and may be unable to turn to family or friends for support if they are not ‘out’ about their sexuality. This can leave LGBTQ people who suffer from domestic violence especially isolated and at risk of further abuse.

About 25% of LGBTQ people suffer through violent or threatening relationships with partners or ex-partners – about the same rate as heterosexual women. Sometimes the abuse looks similar to that experienced by heterosexual women: emotional bullying, physical aggression, threats to harm the victim or other loved ones, social isolation, control of finances, extreme jealousy. There are additional features that can be present in LGBTQ intimate partner violence that do not factor into heterosexual relationships. The abuser may threaten to ‘out’ the victim to friends, family, religious communities, co-workers, and others if he or she does not comply with the abuser’s wishes. The abuser may use the close-knit dynamic of the gay and lesbian community and the lack of support for LGBTQ  people outside the community to further pressure the victim into compliance.